Some black-and-white photography - Cendrine Marrouat

I have a passion for black-and white-images, especially daguerreotypes and tintypes. These are the oldest photographic processes in history.

When I work on the format, I love contrast and texture. Ansel Adams is my role model in that area.

Today, let me show you some of my first black-and-white photos...

Formerly known as New Archangel, Sitka is located on Baranof Island along the Alaska Panhandle and once was the capital of Russian America. In 1804, the Battle of Sitka was the last major conflict between Europeans and native Alaskans.

Sitka National Historical Park has collections of rare artifacts, the preserved remains of a Tlingit fort and a Russian Bishop's House.

West Hawk Lake is located in the Whiteshell Provincial Park in Manitoba, Canada. A meteorite is believed to have created the crater which forms its central portion. ⠀ ⠀

The area is also part of the Canadian Shield that was formed billions of years ago. ⠀

Old Montréal is the oldest area in the city of Montréal, Quebec, Canada, with a few remains dating back to New France. Most of the area was declared a historic district in 1964.

Toronto is the capital of the province of Ontario and one of the most popular cities in North America.

Situated on the southern terminus of an ancient Aboriginal trail, the area was surrendered to the British Crown by the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation in 1787. It became the town of York in 1793, then the capital of Upper Canada.

It's only in 1834 that Toronto got its definitive name. Its status of provincial capital comes from the Canadian Confederation in 1867.

According to Statistics Canada, there are 160 mother tongues spoken in Toronto! And the city also boasts 140 neighbourhoods...

(After being revisited in 1805, the 1787 Toronto Purchase agreement remained in dispute until 2010, when a settlement was finally reached between the Government of Canada and the Mississaugas for lands in the area.)

I'm going to cheat a little and include a couple of more recent photos in this post. ;-) 

There is a chessboard in my house that no one has ever used. Probably because it has a purely decorative role.

However, every time I walk past it, I cannot help but notice the way dust has settled in specific areas.

In June 2016, during a lazy afternoon, I decided to take a few pictures of the board undusted. The result is pretty cool, right?

Powered by SmugMug Log In